Low-frequency chatter genesis during inclined surface copy-milling with ball-end mill: Experimental study

Abstract : In this study low-frequency chatter during machining of inclined surfaces with ball-end mills is experimentally investigated. An explanation of genesis of low-frequency vibrations have been proposed for various conditions: cutting direction; lead angle values; spindle speed; depth of cut. As a result, it has been proven that low-frequency chatter has more significant effect on machined surface than usual chatter. Low-frequency chatter occurs during downward milling, rather than upward milling, especially when lead angle increases. Furthermore, low-frequency chatter takes place in a beginning of cutting process, thereafter develops into steady state of usual chatter, which has no such significant effect on machined surface, as it has been shown. The results are in line with the supposition that low frequency vibrations are caused by sudden and irregular nature of shearing process, when magnitude is small.
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https://hal.insa-toulouse.fr/hal-01820115
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Submitted on : Tuesday, December 4, 2018 - 9:37:36 AM
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Oleksii Shtehin, Sébastien Seguy, Vincent Wagner, Yann Landon, Gilles Dessein, et al.. Low-frequency chatter genesis during inclined surface copy-milling with ball-end mill: Experimental study. Machining Science and Technology, Taylor & Francis, 2018, 22 (4), pp.621-637. ⟨10.1080/10910344.2017.1382515⟩. ⟨hal-01820115⟩

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